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Turkish Journal of Fisheries and Aquatic Sciences 2012, Vol 12, Num, 1     (Pages: 67-71)

Immunomodulatory Potential of a Marine Sponge Spongosorites halichondrioides (Dendy, 1905)

Maushmi S. Kumar 1 ,Dipa Desai 2 ,A.K. Pal 1

1 Division of Fish Nutrition, Biochemistry and Physiology ,Central Institute of Fisheries Education, Off Yari Road, Versova, Andheri (w), Mumbai- 400061
2 SPPSPTM, SVKM'S NMIMS Deemed to be University, Vile Parle (w), Mumbai-400056
DOI : 10.4194/1303-2712-v12_1_08 Viewed : 1998 - Downloaded : 1960 Marine sponges are animals belonging to the Phylum Porifera. They are well known for its medicinal value. However, to prove its efficiency for the clinical utilization, more experimental data will be beneficial. The present study involved the investigation of immunomodulatory activities of methanolic extract of marine sponge Spongosorites halichondriodes from western coast of India. The extract was studied for acute toxicity (OECD-425 guideline), Haemagglutinating antibody (HA) titre, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response and cyclophosphamide-induced myelosuppression for their immunomodulatory potential. The evaluation of immunomodulatory potential by oral administration of methanolic extract of marine sponge (200 mg/kg) evoked a significant decrease in total WBC count as compared to control, in antibody titre values, and also in delayed type hypersensitivity reaction induced by sheep red blood cells. Also it prevented myelosuppression in cyclophosphamide drug treated rats. The results obtained in the present study indicated that extract of marine sponge Spongosorites halichondrioides possesses immunosuppressant activity and can be studied further for isolation of the compounds which can be used for organ rejection purpose in future. Keywords : Spongosorites halichondrioides, Haemagglutinating antibody (HA) titre, Delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response, Cyclophosphamide-induced myelosuppression